Wednesday, December 5, 2012

Costco Wholesale's rotisserie chicken makes great dog food

Seasoned rotisserie chickens at Costco Wholesale in Hackensack. At only $4.99 for a 3-pound chicken, these birds fly out the door, but the quality is questionable.


By VICTOR E. SASSON
EDITOR

I'm sure the editors of the Costco Connection came to praise the rotisserie chicken sold at the warehouse store, not to bury it.

In the latest issue of what is called "a lifestyle magazine for Costco members," customers who love the highly seasoned rotisserie chicken offer their ideas on how to best use leftovers.

However, the most prominent comment is in the voice of "Maggie the Labrador, owned by Will and Jill Mason" of Chandler, Ariz.

"The chicken's so-called leftovers (fat, trimmings and juices) are mixed in with my bowl of normally blase dog food, transforming my food into a weekly treat," the dog is quoted as saying.

That says it in a nutshell: This chicken makes great dog food, not good human food.

Costco puts the "Kirkland Signature" name on the label of the rotisserie chicken, but that is usually reserved for organic eggs, preservative-free smoked wild salmon and other high quality items.


Ingredients include water, salt, sugar, carrageenan, silicon dioxide and polysorbate 80.

Silent on antibiotics

The "Creative Cooking" article in the December 2012 issue doesn't mention harmful animal antibiotics that allow the chicken to achieve its 3-pound weight quickly (Pages 30-31).

The editors don't even say whether the chicken is fed an all-vegetable diet.

Costco sells about 50 million rotisserie chickens a year, the magazine reports.

I tried one of these chickens years ago, and didn't like how it tasted.

It was inferior to the rotisserie chickens I'd pick up at Fairway Market in Harlem, where customers have a choice between a conventional chicken and a Murray's free-roaming bird, which is raised without antibiotics.


A quiet day at Costco Wholesale in Hackensack. The warehouse closed in October 2015, when a bigger Costco opened a few miles away in Teterboro, then reopened in March 2016 as a Costco Business Center.
On a Saturday in late June 2016 at the Teterboro warehouse, one Costco member couldn't wait to get his rotisserie chicken home.

Going natural at Whole Foods

Now, I buy the naturally raised rotisserie chicken at Whole Foods Market in Paramus for family members who eat meat and poultry.

On Tuesday, I asked the Costco employee at the rotisserie chicken stand in Hackensack if he knew which processor supplies the chickens.

He said he didn't, and that they arrive at the store already seasoned, so all he has to do is put them in the big rotisserie cases behind him and when they are fully cooked, pack them in black-and-clear-plastic takeout containers.   

I'm not sure why the Costco Connection is using a hard sell for this low-quality chicken.

The article begins:

"Costco's Kirkland Signature rotisserie chicken has almost a cult following. It even has its own Facebook page."

Costco also sells whole, uncooked Coleman Organic chickens. 

Why not give customers who care what they are eating a choice and offer the organic chicken side-by-side with the mystery rotisserie chicken?

Even the headline used is offensive to fans of Charlie Parker, the late jazz alto saxophonist who was known as "Bird" for his soaring solos.

Costco Connection says:

"Bird is the word"

"Members flock to Costco's rotisserie chicken."

I say: Not if you know what's good for you. 


Related posts


Click on the following links:

Where to find better-quality rotisserie chickens

Costco's low-quality rotisserie bird costs more in Canada


Costco shoppers see red in undercooked chickens

99 comments:

  1. I worked at fairway there chicken isn't that great

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  2. Thanks for the entry, Victor. I am a bit repulsed by the rotisserie birds, but I do buy the Kirkland Signature fresh chicken breasts that come in a pack of 6 pouches (one pair of breasts per pouch). I can't afford the organic ones, but I would like to know more info. Do you have any insight on how and by whom they are produced? Google searching is not turning up any answers. Thanks!

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    Replies
    1. Last week, in the Teterboro, N.J., Costco, I saw Kirkland Signature Organic Chicken Drumsticks instead of Coleman Organic Drumsticks. Don't know if Kirkland Signature also has organic thighs and whole chickens, as Coleman did. Also not sure how prices compare; Kirkland Signature usually is cheaper than national brands.

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  3. We can only assume that chicken comes from a big processor such as Perdue or Tyson. Unfortunately, Costco still sells organic and mystery poultry side by side.

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  4. My husband and I call the Costco chicken "Chernobyl Chicken"

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  5. Do you know where Chernobyl is

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  6. It's the nuclear plant that blew up in Ukraine. The Costco Rotisserie Chicken isn't toxic, but you can find birds of much higher quality.

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  7. I am on a carb free diet...when I eat one of these, it blows my diet...it took several times for me to understand that this was the cause of lapses, weight / water gains.

    Never again, but they are big and cheap.

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    Replies
    1. They are seasoned which may be an issue but the other issue is excessive protein that can be turned into glucose by your body. You should eat more fat and moderate the protein.

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    2. Protein get turned into glucose? You might want to do a little more nutrition research.

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    3. Yes. The "glucose" scare sounds bogus.

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    4. Actually Josh, protein can spike insulin levels, ask any type 1 diabetic. Weird, but true.

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    5. There are a few glucogenic amino acids but protein isn't a big contributor to blood glucose. Also, a type 1 makes no insulin so any "spike" would be from improper dosing. Protein can have a mild effect on post-meal insulin secretion but, again, not a big deal.

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  8. Yes. Probably cheapest out there, but you pay in other ways. Thanks.

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  9. Someone recently mentioned to me these chickens come from China. Does any one know the country of origin?? I haven't been able to find out anything on line.

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  10. That doesn't sound correct. The U.S. poultry industry is extremely well-developed.

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  11. According to this Web site, imports of chicken raised in China are banned for human consumption:

    http://www.poisonedpets.com/u-s-to-consider-importing-chicken-from-china-again-this-time-for-humans/

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  12. For poor people who need a cheap source of meat protein these chickens are fantastic in price and taste... Walmart's family size roast chickens are almost $9 each! I can get 2 of Costco's for a $1 more! I have $100 for food each month and $16 in food stamps, so I need to buy in larger quantities, to have enough for the month. Poor, disabled people can't afford to shop at Whole Foods and Trader Joe's is too expensive for me since their prices went up. Yes they have cheap carbs but their protein is expensive... Yes, I have tried to go without meat but I become weak and sickly in about 3 days.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. That's what makes eating right so damn hard, really.

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    2. Unfortunately, growing or raising food naturally takes more time and costs more.

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    3. I eat only seafood. You don't need meat or poultry to survive.

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    4. I know plenty of people who aren't on a tight budget and purchase Costco rotisserie chicken often. The chicken is good, inexpensive, and it's already done. I don't care what anyone has to say, I will continue to buy this chicken. The chicken from Sam's Club is delicious too.

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    5. Celeste, that is why this food is cheap...they are trying to kill off the less than "beautiful, brainy and brilliant" members of this society...if they can't kill you through low pay...they treat you to meals that are affordable poison dressed up as food...ITS CRIMINAL...but who can we get to stop it with a bought and sold congress? I too cannot afford organic food and I'm getting close to not affording food at all.

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    6. If you are on such a tight budget, why shop for food at a members only warehouse with a $55 annual fee?

      I get my Executive Member fee and much more back in cash rebates by using the Costco American Express Card at gas stations, restaurants and so forth -- the only way shopping there makes sense.

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    7. My Dog is smarter than your Honor Roll StudentAugust 8, 2014 at 12:05 PM

      Then let them eat cake? That's your solution Victor?

      Anyone with common sense will know what it's healthier and sustainable for poor people to eat GMO rice, GMO beans, and Antibiotic Costco Chicken with their food stamp money. If they throw away the skin which has all the fat and sodium, it's a great lowfat source of high quality meat protein.

      If you buy 26 Costco LOSS LEADER rotisserie Chickens at HALF the THE PRICE of what a 3 lb raw Foster Farms/Purdue/Tyson chicken costs, that equals over $100 in savings per year, much more than the $55 annual fee. So a poor person can eat a decent source of protein every other week. They can also buy a huge sack of GMO rice for $30 and a huge sack of GMO beans for $30 at Costco that will last them for months.

      My DOG that eats the left over Costco Rotisserie Chicken is smarter than you or Marie Antoinette since you don't understand the concept of a LOSS LEADER, or what it feels like to go to bed hungry.

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    8. Thanks for the good laugh I had after reading this.

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  13. Did you ever thing that maybe the "Creative Cooking" article in the December 2012 issue doesn't mention harmful animal antibiotics because there ARE NONE!.

    What makes you think Kirkland Signature chicken contains animal antibiotics anyway!

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    Replies
    1. The vast majority of chickens are raised with harmful antibiotics. An absence of those drugs is a selling point no merchant or processor would overlook. With the factory farm system in place in the U.S., you can assume the worse.

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    2. Victor I agree! If Costco is successful in opening it's own chicken " farms", yikes. Any place that slaughters chickens by the tens of thousands( or millions ) is going to be engaging in a type of food processing that I want NOTHING to do with. Cage free?? Ha! I understand to some extent, the argument " I can't afford" this and that.. There are always ways to lower food budget and maintain quality. No- one needs meat every day. Most people in this country don't even need to eat as much as they do! It makes me angry that food quality has become so poor in the mainstream scene. There is a choice, people! Stop supporting these mega corporations that are screwing things up. Eat more locally produced food. If you catr to truly make a change, you can. I buy no meat from any large store.. only small amounts from local farms. Yes it's expensive but it is in small quantities, which is plenty of protein.

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    3. I agree with much of what you say, especially about Americans eating too much and about not eating meat every day. (I eat only wild-caught fish and other seafood.)

      You and I are lucky to have local farms, but we tend to go to the turkey farm only a couple times a year. Family members who eat meat buy antibiotic-free chicken and grass-fed beef at supermarkets.

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  14. As far as I know, Costco sources its chickens from regional producers. In Washington State, it's Foster Farms. Most commercially produced chicken is fed feed with antibiotics. That's the way it is. If we go back to all "old fashioned" food production, 1) food prices will raise considerably, and 2) a lot of people in the world will starve because production will not keep up with the human population. Other people can debate the lesser of two evils. I'm happy to see people opt for a Costco rotisserie rather than, say, KFC fried.
    P.S.: Chickens are not vegetarians. Never have been. They are opportunistic eaters.

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    1. There is a producer in Pennsylvania that doesn't use antibiotics. Readington Farms supplies ShopRite stores in New Jersey with poultry.

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    2. I suspect that the issue is not whether they are eating a purely vegetarian diet, but that if it's NOT vegetarian, then they could be eating other chickens as part of their diet.

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    3. Yes. The chickens could be fed what is referred to as animal byproducts -- bits of dead animals.

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  15. We eat Costco chicken. We also buy a chicken for our dog and cut it up, froze it and thaw and mix it in her food. Are you telling me that this is BAD for the dog as well as for us? The dog eats a little every night in her Blue Buffalo dry dinner. We don' eat it often. When the dog runs out of chicken, we get a couple more. One for her that we cut up and one for us for a couple of nights. People have been eating this for decades. Show me one instance where it's been harmful to someone...where bad health can be directly blamed on the stupid costco chicken.

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    1. I am just saying Consumer Reports and other respected sources say it's better to eat chicken without harmful animal antibiotics and to make sure the birds are raised on a vegetarian diet.

      Doctors say humans are becoming resistant to antibiotics because of all the antibiotics used to raise animals.

      You can eat whatever you want. But if you can afford to buy organic chicken or chicken raised without antibiotics, why would you buy the one at Costco, which you call "stupid"?

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    2. The dog will not care about seasonings so she could eat a plain Costco chicken roasted in the oven. That would be so much better for her than kibble even a premium kibble.

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  16. I like the Costco chickens.

    The reason they are so cheap is that they are a loss leader. People come into the store for chicken and leave with chicken plus lots of other stuff. I read somewhere that store profits jumped 10% when they introduced the chickens.

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    Replies
    1. People always buy a lot of stuff at Costco; many visit the store only once every few weeks, judging from their carts.

      Those chickens are an example of the perils of buying cheap food.

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  17. The cheap and tender chicken is the only reason why some people want to go to Costco.
    It's a very good sales lead, and they make millions, plus people don't buy just chicken. the chicken chef cannot tell you where they come from cause it's probably a big secret and he truly does not know. If the chicken came from a very reputable source then it shouldn't be a secret?!%. If you are getting a good and honest product you would like others to know.

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    1. You don't make any sense. You can find cheap rotisserie chickens everywhere, so why pay a membership fee of $55 or more to buy the one at Costco?

      Also, many Costco shoppers like me don't ever buy the rotisserie birds, and still spend a lot of money there.

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    2. There is a reason they are toward the back of the store drawing customers back there past all the other offerings. I do most of my grocery shopping at Costco and I buy a chicken maybe once or twice a year. Their rib roasts are great.

      Look up the rant by the guy who worked at WF.

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    3. Most of the fresh and prepared food is in the back of the store.

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  18. I found this because I googled "why does Costco rotisserie chicken taste weird?" I LOVE rotisserie chicken even though I know its brined in sugar and not good for you, but I LOVE the crispy skin. I won't eat Costco because the skin is soggy, the thigh meat is often a weird color with an "off" taste. And it often tastes under cooked so the meat does not fall off the bone. I don't care if its a good deal if it tastes like crap compared to the other rotisserie places near me.

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  19. Got one free with membership promo. Gross.

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  20. I used to buy a Costco chicken once a week, eat the breasts and feed the rest to my dog mixed in with her kibble. It wasn't long that my dog would get sick and vomit, always after eating the left overs. I took her to the vet who told me to stop feeding the dog rotisserie Costco chickens as they are brined and full of salt, she said was not good for your dog, it's not good for you either!
    http://www.hungrypoodle.com/should-you-buy-rotisserie-chicken/

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  21. Thanks. Hope your dog is feeling better.

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  22. I stopped buying Costco rotisserie chickens some time ago. Yes they are big and would appear good value for money, but I found the breast meat to be 'spongy', this leads me to believe that they are pumped full of water. Take a good look at the meat next time you buy one, it even looks 'spongy' .Its a shame as I have always trusted the Costco brand. Fortunately they have many other products that they are to be commended on, unfortunately the rotisserie chicken, in my opinion, isn't one of them!

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    1. is soaked in an STPP (sodium triphosphate bath to absorb water, which means you’ll pay more for the product by the pound because the excess water to plump them up. This compound is also used in making soap, and other products.

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    2. "Sodium triphoshate" is listed on the ingredients label for Costco's rotisserie chicken.

      But I think you mean the chicken is injected with this salty solution, not soaked in a sodium triphosphate bath to absorb it.

      That's been the practice for many years followed by Perdue, Tyson and other processors of low-quality chickens raised on antibiotics.

      Salt makes food taste better, and that's why tons of it goes into chickens, pasta sauces and so many other products.

      Thanks, for your comment.

      Delete
  23. I was having some arthritis issues recently. Had a costco rotisserie chicken for dinner one evening for dinner, next morning my hands were swollen to twice their size. Had to take prednisone to bring down the swelling.

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  24. The Costco chicken tastes like rubber. It's like a fake chicken. I stopped buying them a year ago because they caused me to become lethargic. I recommend a free range organic chicken roasted at home.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for your comment and recommendation.

      Delete
  25. What about the questionable plastic packaging? Everyone now should know not to put hot food in plastic. The chemicals will leach into the food. I see at the store that as soon as the chicken comes out of the oven onto the plastic tray it goes and cover it with more plastic. A questionable quality bird, add to that more chemicals from the plastic, the reader that names this product "Chernobyl chicken" was actually right!

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    Replies
    1. Absolutely. That is a big concern. Never reheat food in plastic containers or cover plates of food you reheat in microwave with plastic wrap.

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  26. From a former NJ resident, now live in Boca Raton, FL. Have been a member of Costco for over 20yrs and what a difference. As far as the chickens go they used to be pretty good and the largest rotisserie birds you could find. The meat fell off the bone. Now I hardly ever buy them. The chickens are much smaller and tough, without much taste other than what's injected. Over the years have seen Costco quality go down consistently Wonder if its still worth the 55 membership. Still a few things that I can't get anywhere else...coffee/gas/frozen veggies..still good and a bargain. btw...victor love your blog...little taste of home..thanks

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    1. Thanks, David. Yes. I agree Costco quality doesn't always live up to the hype, but the increasing number of organic and naturally grown items -- and the fresh wild salmon from May to October -- keep me coming back.

      I also get cash rebates that cover my membership fee, but could do without the crowds and parking hassles.

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  27. I think it really depends on the Costco one shops at and who is supplying the chickens. I got ill recently and had to cut down on fat and carbs.

    I've had the rotisserie chickens from Ralphs and Vons/Pavillions and they weren't that great, for my taste buds but palatable if you can get them on their $5 Fridays.

    The chicken at Whole Foods was delicious, and best of all for me, they offer a low salt version which I would recommend, if one can afford it. It's higher in price and small (perfect for me as I am one person, but a family, you might need 2). So for many, it does come down to economics and that influences choice.

    I've recently tried the Costco chicken close to where I live, and I found it to be really good. Cooked thoroughly, not too dry, not dripping in grease either. I do not eat the skin, and I'm just eating the white, breast portion - so I cannot recommend any other portion of it.

    It's been an addition to my new diet and so far, as 3oz of protein goes, it's been fine when Whole Foods sells out of theirs, which is often. I've gotta be honest, I am not a big fish eater (because I really don't trust what is happening to the fish more than what's happening to poultry), and I eat the 'basic' 5 types of veggies (and even they are getting GMO'ed!!), are very limited on red meats, but love mostly all the green leafy vegetables, so I fill up on those. But when I want a protein, I go to chicken.

    I agree with you very much that people need to know where their neighborhood chicken/food comes from, regardless of what store, and keep in mind that even if it claims to be "organic", become a bit skeptical there too.

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    1. Thanks for your comments. I, for one, trust organic.

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  28. I go to Costco once or twice a week and I definitely believe that it's worth the membership.

    I do eat the chicken from there sometimes. It's okay, and I like it a lot better than what you get with fast food. It's great because they offer it at a loss compared to other retailers selling the same thing but marked higher. The majority of chickens are given antibiotics and the only way to get chicken is, I guess, going organic.

    Costco does not make any money off their chickens. Nor do they make any money off their hot dog combos at their food court. As many commentators state here, it's their loss leaders among other things.

    There is no argument from me that Organic is what people should be buying. However organic is beyond most people's budgets. I personally buy organic milk from Costco and know the temptation when non-organic milk is right next to it at more than half the price.

    So limiting yourself to organic only foods is next to impossible unless you: 1) can afford it. 2) know where your food comes from. 3) research organic labeling in your state because it can differ. 4) become a farmer; raise & grow your own food!

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    Replies
    1. Organic isn't the only way to get antibiotic-free chickens. There are brands, such as Readington Farms at ShopRite and Empire at Costco, that are drug-free, but not organic.

      I don't understand consumers like you who question organic labeling, but not the meaningless "all natural" claims you see on so many products. You don't have to "research" organic labeling in your state.

      Costco carries a growing number of organic foods at great prices. If you use your Costco credit card at gas stations, restaurants and other stores, you get cash rebates (a check sent to you by Costco) that easily covers your membership fee and makes Costco organics even more affordable.

      Delete
  29. Looks like costco is phasing out suppliers that give antibiotics to their chicken by late 2015! Google 'costco chicken antibiotic'

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    Replies
    1. Not so fast. The stories that came up with that Google search were from March, and no target date was published. That means the transition could be years away.

      Costco could immediately offer an alternative to its crappy rotisserie chicken, which is raised on antibiotics, by offering whole rotisserie Coleman Organic Chicken, which you can buy uncooked in the same stores.

      Delete
  30. I have a vegan and occasionally I will eat meat if it is appropriate. After researching what was in Costco chickens I realized that it was not appropriate for me to eat this food. Certainly it would be of the quality I might give to my dog but I would not eat it after finding out how it is prepared and the questions about its source and qualityThe meat tastes great but that is not a good reason to eat it. They should publish exactly what's in it and what isn't.

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    1. I agree that Costco can do better by its members.

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  31. Thank you for bringing this to my attention on your blog

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  32. Has anyone got the chill's and shakes and rapid heart beat age eating one of costco chickens?

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for your question, Teri. I wouldn't be surprised ...

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  33. Just to let you know: whole foods has been outed for NOT actually having "natural" meats. They DO NOT grass-feed and their animals are abused, as they otherwise claimed. So, you're paying more for nothing.

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    Replies
    1. Even if what you say isn't pure fabrication, that doesn't improve the crappy quality of Costco's rotisserie chicken.

      And you're the "nothing" who doesn't cite sources and hides behind an anonymous tag.

      Delete
    2. Your follow-up comment, which I trashed, makes you sound like the loser I thought you were from your first message.

      Delete
  34. you're more likely to get a disease from the anti-vaccine psychos out there than you are from eating costco chicken...

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Jack. True. But that won't get to me to buy one.

      Delete
  35. Ugh my mom bought rotisserie chicken today at costco. It was undercooked. Figured it out after I took the skin off and ate the wing then pulled the dark meat off at the bottom And saw how link it still was and how fat the skin was. I'm sitting on the toilet hating life. Ugh.

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  36. I ate undercooked rotisserie chicken just about half hr ago from costco and found it was undercooked after I ate the skin and meat and notice how thick and fatty the skin still was. I looked underneath the chicken and it was still pink and had blood showing. Ugh.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorry to hear that, Ken. You sent in a second comment with additional details that I haven't published, but will if you want me to.

      Delete
    2. I have same experience. all the r. chicken I bought at Costco were bloody in the joints, and pink on the muscle areas. these areas as so undercooked that bright red blood oozes when i cut into the joints. i used to throw it away, until i thought i'd bring it to Costco's attention to fix it. apparently, they have been aware but could not anything bec their rotisserie thermostat is already set at what supposed to be a perfect setting. Costco encouraged me to just bring in my concern to their merchandise return desk and i will get a refund. I take pictures of the bloody chicken instead of bringing the actual bloody chicken. sure i get refunded, no questions asked. one would think how lucky i am for getting free r. chicken. but i am not. the problem is not fixed, and i can keep bringing pictures and get refunded everytime...but i hope they will eventually do it right. bec i love Costco's rotisserie chicken (just remove the fats).

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  37. I love Costco's/Kirkland's rotisserie chicken but every time, it is bloody on the joints! I tried to bring it to their attention but I was told to just take my concern ( I take pictures) to the merchandise return counter and I will be refunded. I said my intention is to bring it to someone's attention so it will get fixed (not get refund every time). I was told, the thermostat for their rotisserie is fixed and set at supposed to be its perfect cooking setting that I cannot be adjusted any further. That I should just bring my bloody chicken pictures and I will get a refund. ONe would think I would enjoy my free super most delicious rotisserie chicken in the whole world. Not. I wish for them to fix it. How do I write to them? Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This sounds like the same person who sent in the previous comment. Costco has a Facebook page that is monitored by management, so why don't you express your concerns there:

      https://www.facebook.com/Costco/

      Look for the space that says, "Write something" and then hit "Post"

      Delete
  38. That's great to know they will replace but my point is you can get deathly sick from eating raw chicken. I'm not trying to file a law suit or anything. I'm just saying it's nasty eating raw chicken when it should be cooked especially eating skin "which my dog ate that is really fat raw and clumpy.
    Btw I am not annonymous person I am Ken Kurose.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Ken. I got two Anonymous comments that were similar, as well as two comments from you that were similar. No problem.

      Delete
  39. Well, this seems like just an attack on Costco. There is little difference in rotisserie chickens sold on any market as a business, including fried ones as KFC, church's,...
    If you want "healthy" chicken meal, go buy organic/wild-raised one for more than double the price and cook it yourself. Also, U.S. Government does not allow "meat, raw or produce and plants" be imported from foreign country. So blame our own food industry.

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    Replies
    1. There are less-expensive, antibiotic-free whole chickens that aren't organic, including Perdue's Harvestland brand. But if you want to continue to eat crap, be my guest.

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  40. I have nothing against costco. I just came back shopping there. I just wanted to share my opinion because I did get really sick after I ate there chicken. Maybe if people voice or write there opinion about there chicKen they will make a change.

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  41. I am confused by the label on the Kirkland Rotisserie Chicken that says "No added Hormones or Antibiotics ever." which is misleading. I did ask at my local Costco who was the chicken supplier and they said it was a Fosters All Natural chicken. Also I did call them a few times to ask about if there are any hormones or antibiotics in their chicken and they couldn't answer me. Victor do you know if now they have antibiotics free chicken and I supposed they allowed to publish the sentence about not having antibiotics and hormones bec of the word "added"?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I haven't looked at the label recently, but if it says "no added hormones or antibiotics ever", that's a significant change.

      I'll look for a photo I took of the label just after the new Costco in Teterboro opened in mid-October to see if it carries those words.

      Delete
    2. My wife took a photo of the label on Friday, and it's the same as it has always been. It says, "No added hormones or steroids." There is no mention of antibiotics, a sure sign they are being used to raise the birds.

      The rotisserie chicken is the same low-quality bird it has always been.

      Delete
    3. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
  42. The U.S. government bans the use of hormones and steroids to raise chickens, so for Costco to say they are never used is meaningless.

    Regulators don't ban human antibiotics. Two types are used, one to fight disease in crowded chicken houses and the second to promote growth. Some of Perdue's chickens grow so large they fall over and can't get back up.

    Of course, they are sent to slaughter anyway.

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  43. Victor, thank you for your blog! Like everyone I struggle with balancing finance and eating healthy. I have this debate with my friends almost every single time that i have them over for a home cooked meal. They always ask how can you cook everyday? It is time consuming, often just as expensive as eating out. All I have to say is that your body knows what it's eating and your health is that much better for understanding and educating yourself with knowledge of food and where it comes from. I read through your blog today just trying to figure out where to get salmon. And I have to applaud you for taking your time to share your blog with everyone, and how you handle the negative feedback. Thank you and i'll be checking out your thread thoroughly :)

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    Replies
    1. Thank you so much for your comment. Your philosophy is terrific.

      There is still plenty to read in Do You Really Know What You're Eating? But for the last couple of months or so I've also been writing about food shopping and cooking and eating out in The Sasson Report:

      http://thesassonreport.blogspot.com/

      You'll also find a link to the older blog there.

      Delete

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